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Okay, so the internet never really sleeps, but in some parts of the world, people do switch their internet connections off at night. A team of researchers from the University of Southern California pinged 4 billion IP address every 11 minutes over the course of 2 months and have created a map of internet connections as they turn on and off at different times of the day. According to their study, people with high-speed connections in the US and in Europe tend to leave their home routers up and running all day, while many parts of Asia, Eastern Europe and South America don't. That makes sense: in those places, not everyone has home broadband, and internet cafes close in the evening. As you might have guessed, the study found that the poorer the country is, the more likely people are to turn off their routers, and vice versa.

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So, you've taken a look at the new iPhones and iPads and thought to yourself: "Nah, it's time to see if the grass really is greener on the other side." Well, good timing, because Google has published a guide to help you switch from iOS to its newest platform, Android Lollipop. The tech giant has laid it all out for you: its instructions include how to upload photos stored on iPhones and iPads to Google+, transfer music from iTunes to Google Play Music, keep all your contacts and even set up mail and messaging, among others. In short, it's what you need to read if the only thing keeping you from moving platforms is the process itself. If you're ready to switch allegiance, keep an eye out for the Nexus 6 smartphone, the Nexus 9 tablet or the Nexus player, as those will be the first devices to come loaded with Lollipop (though some older devices are also getting it through software upgrades). But in case you're actually having issues switching to iOS instead of from, don't worry: Apple has also published a guide to help you become a bona fide iOS user.

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Microsoft pitches the Xbox One not as a run-of-the-mill games console, but as a fully fledged home entertainment hub. For most Americans, making use of the One's TV integration features is as simple as plugging the HDMI output from their set-top box straight into the console. Europeans don't have it quite as easy. With old-school coaxial cables still in common use, Microsoft cooked up the Xbox One Digital TV Tuner: a small USB peripheral that turns coaxial outputs into something the console can understand. Today, the TV Tuner has finally gone on sale in the UK for £25, and in France, Germany, Italy and Spain for €30. Once set up, you can start watching TV through your Xbox One, using the console's OneGuide EPG to browse channel listings with a controller, or with voice commands if you have a Kinect camera. The Xbox also becomes a make-shift DVR, allowing you to pause and rewind live TV. And when you absolutely have to spend time in another room, you can continue to watch live TV on mobile devices by streaming it through the Xbox One SmartGlass app.

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After the new-but-not-very-fresh iPad mini 3, the most disappointing part of Apple's recent show-and-tell was the $499 Mac mini -- the RAM is now soldered in, making it impossible to upgrade. iFixit has just revealed that the model has other user-unfriendly features as well. While access to the RAM used to be dead simple, it's now guarded by a metal cover held in place by Torx TR6 Security screws, which require an exotic tool. Adding a second hard drive is also, er, harder, since unlike past models, there's just a single SATA port (though you may be able to install a PCIe SSD). Finally, as mentioned, both the RAM and Intel Core-i5 CPU are soldered in permanently. That's not very cricket on Apple's part, considering that past Mac minis were a breeze to access and update. Still, thanks to a lack of glue and easy disassembly with the right tools, the iMac eked a passing repairability grade of 6 out of 10.

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Remember when we told you about HalloweenCostumes.com's officially-licensed light-up high tops from Back To The Future Part II? We joked that the kicks would have gone great with ZBoard's limited-edition Hoverboard that it produced for the Michael J. Fox foundation last year. Unfortunately, only 50 decks and 25 full boards were created for the auction, so it looks as if that (time-traveling) train has sailed. Well, until now, that is, since the company has now produced a general-sale run of its bright pink electric skateboard, and will even sell you the high tops in a single bundle. The board on its own will set you back $600, while a set with the futuristic kicks is priced at $700, plus one lucky competition winner will win a complete replica of Marty McFly's future outfit from the movie. Be warned, however, as you've only got 14 days to scrounge together the cash, or else you'll be outtatime (geddit?).

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Amazon Kindle Voyage

Amazon just found a way to put further pressure on Hachette in its ongoing pricing war: strike a deal with another publisher. The online retailer has forged a new agreement with Simon & Schuster that will keep the book giant's digital and physical titles on Amazon for multiple years. The full terms of the deal aren't available, but the Wall Street Journal claims that it reaches a middle ground; Simon & Schuster will normally set prices, while Amazon will have the right to discount books in some situations. However it works, both sides are claiming it as a victory. Amazon argues that it gives the publisher a "financial incentive" to drop prices, while a letter from Simon & Schuster describes the pact as "economically advantageous" for both itself and authors.

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If you don't count buying a few drinks or other niceties, finding love on Tinder is essentially free, but it looks like that'll change come next month. The app's CEO and cofounder Sean Rad recently teased at Forbes' Under 30 event that new features will be added that users have apparently been clamoring for. What's more, he thinks they'll offer enough value that a specific subset of its user-base will be willing to pay for them. The core experience of swiping left or right on potential matches to like or dislike, respectively, won't see any fees tacked on, but an ability to expand your Tinder reach beyond your current location and into other cities is coming in November. Perfect for striking up conversations before you start traveling, it'd seem. As you'll see in the video below, Rad isn't keen to say just how much this will cost as of now, only that monetizing these "hacks" will allow the outfit to reinvest in itself. With how the application has handled location data in the past, however, let's hope this turns out for the best.

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United aircraft at SFO's departure gates

It was only a matter of time before San Francisco International Airport allowed direct visits from app-based ridesharing services besides Sidecar, and those floodgates have officially opened. Both Lyft and Uber (specifically, UberX and UberXL) now have the all-clear to stop at SFO's terminals. If you need a ride to your hotel, you no longer have to pay for an expensive taxi or else brave the mass transit system. It's difficult to know how this increased competition will work in practice, but a successful rollout could get other airports following suit.

[Image credit: Angelo DeSantis, Flickr]

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It's impossible to talk about hoverboards without invoking a particular movie title, so we're not even going to try: Remember that awesome scene from Back to the Future Part II? It's one step closer to reality: A California startup just built a real, working hoverboard. Arx Pax is attempting to crowdfund the Hendo Hoverboard as a proof of concept for its hover engine technology -- it's not quite the floating skateboard Marty McFly rode through Hill Valley (and the Wild West), but it's an obvious precursor to the imagined ridable: a self-powered, levitating platform with enough power to lift a fully grown adult.

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Audi's execs must have toasted to their autonomous car's success this weekend, because the self-driving RS 7 has successfully conquered the Hockenheimring racing circuit in Germany. While the company's announcement doesn't get into specifics, it says the modified sedan finished each lap in just over two minutes, close to the original two minutes and 10 seconds estimate. It doesn't confirm a top speed either, but the commentator in the video after the break says the car reached 137mph, driving the optimal trajectory you'd expect a top racer to take. As we've mentioned before, the automated RS 7 is completely driverless and uses GPS and photos taken by a 3D imaging camera to track its position down to 1 to 2 centimeters -- something it's obviously executed well during the Hockenheimring stunt.

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