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Why Hollywood Loves 'Interstellar' Director Christopher Nolan
by Ben Fritz,
The Wall Street Journal

Folks in Hollywood seem to trust director Christopher Nolan to crank out films that'll grab box office bucks. His latest effort, Interstellar, hits movie theaters next week, and it cost a whopping $165 million to make. According to The Wall Street Journal's Ben Fritz, the last non-franchise film to shell out that much was Nolan's 2010 film Inception. The filmmaker seems to get whatever he needs to craft his movies, with the trust that he'll keep his streak of success going.

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Night traffic speeds through the Gangnam district of Seoul, South Korea.

The steady flow of vehicles is noisy enough as it is, but it also gives off a type of noise the human ear can't hear: seismic noise, or the vibration of the ground. Thus, vibrations given off by cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes on the runway among other modes of transportation haven't really been studied in depth -- until now. A team of researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have recently found a way to "hear" those vibrations using 5,300 geophones, screwdriver-like devices used to record ground movements. They placed a geophone every 300 feet in Long Beach for their study and soon realized that thanks to the devices, they could count airplanes and measure their acceleration on the runway and even detect larger vehicles like trucks on a highway. In the future, the same method could be used to monitor traffic, which could then lead to better roads and more road signals where they're most needed.

[Image credit: Vincent_St_Thomas/Getty]

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These days we could all use a little more mobile bandwidth, and the folks at AT&T and Verizon are giving us some. Let's break it down, shall we? If you're on an AT&T single-line plan or have two to three devices, the company is now offering 3GB of data as opposed to the prior 2GB for $40 per month. And now, the carrier's $70 tier will net you 6GB of bandwidth instead of 4GB. This new allocation starts November 2nd, and as Gigaom points out, the double-data promo for higher-tier plans runs until November 15th. Verizon has a sorta similar deal going, but it's for plans that have higher bandwidth to start. Big Red is bumping its $80 per-month customers from 6GB to 10GB and the previous 10GB, $100 per-month tier is getting a bump to 15GB of data. This is apparently a limited-time offer, but, hey, at least it extends to both new and existing customers starting this Saturday.

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Engadget Expand is our annual event that's all about you -- our fans. It's not your typical tech conference that's priced for people fortunate to have an expense account. We make the event completely FREE thanks to our generous sponsors, giving you the chance to experience the future -- right now. And while you're at it, you get to meet your favorite Engadget editors.

When you join us at the Javits Center North in New York City next week on November 7-8, you'll be set loose on our show floor. You can check out some of our exhibitors and get your hands on gadgets that people can't buy yet (or in some cases, build your own in our workshops), head to our Expand stage and hear from some smart and inspiring people and so much more.

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You are done (DONE!) taking selfies with a phone like some plebeian -- you only take DSLR selfies now, even though it's a pain transferring photos using a camera without built-in WiFi. A camera attachment called Lumera wants to solve that problem by giving you a way to upload high-res snapshots to Instagram, Facebook or Twitter with a single click. To integrate the WiFi and Bluetooth Low Energy device with a DSLR, you need to attach it via the tripod screw and plug it into the camera's mini-USB port. So long as you define the social networks of your choice on its accompanying app, you won't have to take out your phone to upload pics anymore. The app itself is pretty useful, though: it can stream whatever the camera's viewfinder is looking at, set timelapses and access the DSLR's settings remotely.

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A lot can happen between the time and the sun rises and sets -- especially in the future we live in. So, what's new 'round these parts? Well, Samsung debuted super thin, all-metal smartphones; our Joseph Volpe penned a eulogy for Nintendo's Wii U and our Sean Buckley reviewed ASUS' new gaming laptop, the ROG G751. There are more stories than that, though, and you can find those in the gallery below!

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When you hear someone else speak, specific neurons in your brain fire. Brian Pasley and a bunch of his colleagues discovered this at the University of California, Berkeley. And not only that, but those neurons all appeared to be tuned to specific sound frequencies. So, Pasley had a thought: "If you're reading text in a newspaper or a book, you hear a voice in your own head," so why can't we decode that internal voice simply by monitoring brain activity. It's similar to the idea that led to the creation of BrainPort, which lets you "see" with your tongue. Your eyes, ears or vocal chords don't really do the heavy lifting, it's your brain. And if you can give the brain another source of input or output you might be able to train it to approximate a lost ability like speech.

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So, you noticed that NVIDIA has trotted out its latest GPU architecture and you're wondering if you should retire your old gaming laptop for something with a little more... pep. You aren't alone. Every time NVIDIA downsizes its flagship GPUs for the notebooks, manufacturers flood the market with new and improved laptops promising to give desktop gaming rigs a run for their money. The phrase "desktop-class" usually gets thrown around with reckless abandon, but the new machines never quite match the performance of their fully grown counterparts. Will this year's Maxwell-based 980M GPUs fare any better? Let's find out: The ASUS ROG (Republic of Gamers) G751 just landed in Engadget's bullpen, and it's aching to be reviewed.

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As beautiful as the look of the Moto 360 is, there are people who would prefer something that's styled more like a traditional watch. For this, the MB Chronowing, created by fashion designer Michael Bastian and engineered by HP, could be the perfect solution. The new wearable, which will be compatible with iOS and Android, combines smartwatch features with an appearance reminiscent of older watches. Aside from that, the MB Chronowing can let you control your music right from your wrist, as well as display email/text notifications and sync with a calendar or alarm. And, better yet, it does these things while looking quite elegant -- after all, it does come from a fashion designer.

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In the last few years 3D printing has gone from a niche within a niche, to one of the most headline-grabbing fields in tech. Consumers haven't exactly embraced the technology, but it is beginning to trickle down into the homes of more hobbyists and entrepreneurs. The DIY community has fallen in love with its versatility and even NASA has embraced it as a way to do ad hoc repairs on the International Space Station. But really, that's just scratching the surface of what 3D printers are capable of. Vaiva Kalnikaitė and her company Dovetailed used fruit juice to print edible fruits, and surgeons have used 3D-printed parts to repair injuries. There are even people out there printing human organs and homes. We're going to be sitting down with Kalnikaitė and Anna Kaziunas France, digital fabrication editor at Maker Media, at Engadget Expand on November 8th. But in case you need a little tease to get you in the mood, we've got a short Q&A with Kalnikaitė after the break.

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