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After many tests, SpaceX's first real try at launching a reusable rocket will attempt flight again in just a few minutes -- watch the live stream here or embedded after the break. Scrubbed due to weather a couple of days ago, the Falcon 9 rocket is once again facing gloomy skies, but according to launch control, everything is a go. Weather permitting, the launch is scheduled for 3:25PM ET, and there's more to it than just this rocket. SpaceX is already working on more reusable rockets, and you can see its latest one in a video embedded after the break. Also important is what's onboard the Dragon cargo ship this rocket is launching. Headed to the ISS, it's bringing new supplies and a pair of bendable legs for our friend Robonaut 2.

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Snatching up a new camera can be a considerable investment, especially if you're after a unit that combines stellar images with a host of features. Fret not friends: We're here to help. Just beyond the break, you'll find a handful of photo gadgets that are all available at attractive discounts for the time being.

If there are other cameras, lenses and the like you have your eye on that we haven't included here -- join us and add them to your "Want" list. Every time there's a price cut in the future, you'll get an email alert!

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Here's a shocker: Facebook's first major update to Paper, its socially-augmented news-reading app, makes it more social. Specifically, the app's 1.1 update now allows users to comment on posts using photos, added birthday and event notifications and tacked on an unread-message counter to help users keep track of Group activity. Facebook hasn't fiddled with the user interface much, but content from Bloomberg, Mashable, Popular Science and six other news sources have been gussied up with new, custom article covers. Oh, and the company says its made the app run a little faster, too. It's not a game changing update, but anything's better than forgetting your spouse's birthday -- assuming Facebook's main app didn't already remind you. Has Paper found its way to your home screen? We're running a quick poll: skip past the break to drop in a vote or leave us a note.

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​Looking for a positive take to cut though all the negative press that Heartbleed has been getting? Then the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has one. The news has been full of stories about the exploit in OpenSSL (itself, an open-source project) that has caused a wave of panic around the internet. With much of the public not understanding what open-source is (it's complex, but mostly involves freedom to redistribute, and access to the code it's built on), and the fact that all this can be caused by a few lines of edited text, the integrity of open-source software has understandably come under scrutiny. We spoke with a representative from the OSI, and they gave us the positive spin we'd all been looking for.

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word wifi written in a...

Last week at the NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) show, FCC head Tom Wheeler pushed broadcasters to loosen their grip on spectrum that the agency plans to auction off to give wireless internet room to grow. Now, he's laid out a draft of the rules for the auction before it takes place next year. The upcoming incentive auction will be a three stage process that, once completed, should open up more wireless spectrum for high-speed services like WiFi. WiFi operates on "unlicensed spectrum" that's open for anyone to use, and similar networks or devices could take advantage of any new frequencies the FCC opens up, while reducing interference with existing networks. That's good and bad however, since they'd fill the space in between networks, it could be harder to build up something like WiFi.

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Sony Xperia Z2

It's been nearly three years since I reviewed the Xperia Neo, manufactured by what was then Sony Ericsson. The Neo represented just the second generation of Xperia phones running on Android, from a period when Sony was finding its feet in the world of mobile and still chucking out plenty of duds (I'm looking at you, Tablet P). Fast-forward to today and things have changed dramatically under Kaz Hirai's stewardship. I'll tell you this right now: The Z2 is an easy phone to recommend, at least for those living in countries where it'll definitely be available (a list that includes the UK and Canada, but not yet the US). The only real caveat is the handset's huge, monolithic construction (a far cry from puny, 126-gram Neo). As you'll see, if you can get past its size, the Z2 addresses some of the most serious gripes we had with its predecessors, the Xperia Z and Z1, particularly with respect to its LCD display. In fact, in some respects, it's far ahead of any other Android phone currently on the market.

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After last week's Very Special Episode, we've grabbed a Hair of the Dog (or two...or three), a bit of rest, and we're back for a regular ol' episode of The Engadget Podcast. We're discussing a triplet of topics that are assuredly close to your heart and head: the experimental and bizarre phones from Amazon and Google, and the hit security flaw that all the kids are raving about (Heartbleed). The show starts at 12PM ET sharp(ish), so grab your favorite plate of leftovers, a set of cans and a comfy seat. And tune in!

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BRD RedShift MX hybrid motorcycle

The US' special operations forces frequently can't rely on conventional ground transportation for their covert ops -- a loud engine is guaranteed to blow their cover. To tackle this problem, DARPA has just awarded Logos Technologies a contract to build a stealthy hybrid motorcycle for the military. The design modifies BRD's all-electric RedShift MX (pictured here) with a quiet hybrid power system that can run on multiple fuel types. The overhaul lets soldiers travel long distances while keeping a relatively low profile, and they can run solely on electric power for shorter periods if silence is absolutely vital. It's too soon to say when the bike will go into service or just how well it will perform, but it could be a lifesaver for troops that need both speed and secrecy.

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A terminally ill woman has reminded us of the limitless potential for devices like the Oculus Rift beyond just gaming and entertainment. After Roberta Firstenberg's cancer treatments failed last year, she was told she had just a few months to live. That prompted her game artist granddaughter Priscilla ("Pri") to send a moving note to the Oculus Rift support team, who quickly decided to send a dev unit. Using the 3D headset, Roberta was able to experience mobility again with the Tuscany Villa demo, complete with virtual trees, stairs and butterflies. She was even able to see her younger self and a beloved, deceased pet via a fortuitous Google Street View snap -- which inspired another idea.

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Samsung Milk Music on a Galaxy Note 3

You know what they say about all good things in life. Samsung has been offering an ad-free version of its Milk Music service for no charge since launch, but the company has posted a new infographic revealing that Americans will soon have to pay $4 per month for a Premium tier to escape marketers. You'll also get some "exclusive features" as a bonus, although it's not clear just what they'll entail. We've reached out to learn more about both the paid service launch and what those perks will be. For now, you'll want to cherish the current listening experience -- it may not be around for much longer.

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