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A Chinese Long March rocket has blasted off for a lunar flyby today, bringing with it a spacecraft for what claims to be the first privately funded mission to the moon. This spacecraft (attached to the rocket's upper stage) is a 31-pound vehicle called 4M manufactured by Luxembourg-based company LuxSpace. 4M will be broacasting signals throughout the duration of its journey (it has already started doing so), and anybody on Earth is welcome to try and receive/decode those messages. In fact, the company wants to encourage radio amateurs (even you) to join in by holding contests later on -- just check out 4M's mission page for clues on where to begin.

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macbook air security

A widespread attack has exposed millions to malware that holds files to ransom. The campaign, which was first detected a month ago, placed fake adverts on websites such as Yahoo, AOL and The Atlantic that installed so-called "ransomware" onto a victim's computer. The attackers stole assets from the likes of Case Logic, Bing and Fancy in order to make the malicious ads appear real, but once a computer becomes infected, things get very bad, very fast, for victims.

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Remember 360fly? The panoramic camera from EyeSee360, which built the panoramic GoPano iPhone lens, has been on the scene since early this year at NAB. Now, the WiFi- and Bluetooth-equipped 360fly camera has been given the nod by the FCC, and an attached review manual gives us a better idea how it works. As the company showed earlier, it's a single-lens 360 degree horizontal and 240 degree vertical fisheye lens that has "the widest field of view on the market." It uses an iOS 8 or Android 4.3+ app that turns your Bluetooth LE-equipped smartphone into a 360 degree video viewfinder with full remote control.

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If you'd rather that your non-game Oculus Rift experiences be nonfiction, it looks like that wish is coming your way rather soon. Next week, Zero Point hits Steam and it offers full 360 degree views of a Department of Defense military training camp, a beach scene and even the extremely crowded LA Convention Center during E3 2013. The rub of the video is that it's the first of its kind -- a documentary about virtual reality, filmed in VR and made for the platform. It's very meta. Each scene is explorable, with either head tracking, a game controller or a mouse running the action. It's apparently compatible with all past-and-future Oculus dev kits, and will cost $15 come its October 28th release. However, IGN notes that if you purchase before November 4th it'll only run you $12. Want a preview before you buy? Of course you do; just head past the break for that.

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Microsoft Lumia logo

Over a year after the acquisition was first announced, Microsoft is officially replacing the Nokia Lumia brand. In a blog post today, the software giant revealed its upcoming smartphones will now be known as Microsoft Lumia. The new Microsoft branding will appear on future phones from the company, with a plain black version of the company's four-squared logo also set to make an appearance.

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Online radio streaming app iHeartRadio has just made good on its promise to add support for CarPlay, Apple's new car infotainment system. But, it's not the only app joining Spotify on CarPlay today -- Rdio, a free music streaming service with offline playback, is tagging along. By introducing optimized apps for Cupertino's car platform, both online services make it easier for users to navigate their interfaces on an onboard screen. Sadly, there are very few people who can actually enjoy the updates right now, as CarPlay's only available on Ferrari FFs and select Pioneer in-dash systems, though most automakers promise to load it on their vehicles' entertainment systems in the future. Other web services also vow to eventually introduce optimized apps for the platform, including CBS News Radio and, of course, Beats Music.

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Loyal Honda fans, crisis averted. You don't have to switch to Subaru, Volvo or Ford if you want their anti-collision technology, now that the Japanese automaker has officially announced its own. The company has just launched a new and enhanced driver-assistive system called "Sensing," which, true to its name, can sense vehicles and pedestrians that might be blocking your way. Using a radar hidden in the front grille coupled with a camera on the windshield, the system can detect whether you're in danger of colliding with another vehicle or a person crossing the street. It then gives you both audio and visual warnings if so, gently applies the break if you still haven't after a while, and then brakes hard in your stead if you're thisclose to running somebody over or smashing against another car.

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The internet's been blamed for making a lot of things redundant, and you'd be justified in assuming that that extended to America's Funniest Home Videos too. Except, surprisingly, the wealth of cat videos and stripper-pole-fail clips online hasn't had a fatal effect on the long-running show, according to Bloomberg. How the series has managed to survive is apparently been by embracing the internet and creating a trio of YouTube channels, a Facebook page that, according to AFV's Vin Di Bona, gets an average 5,000 to 10,000 shares per post and a partnership with online video giant Maker Studios. Di Bona also says that the wealth of AFV digital content is driving viewers back to its traditional broadcasts too.

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In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, photo, Chet Kanojia, founder and CEO of Aereo, Inc., stands next to a server array of antennas as he holds an antenna between his fingers, in New York.  Aereo is one of several startups created to deliver traditional media over the Internet without licensing agreements. Past efforts have typically been rejected by courts as copyright violations. In Aereo’s case, the judge accepted the company’s legal reasoning, but with reluctance. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Aereo can no longer relay TV shows to its customers using its teeny-tiny antennas (for now, that is), according to US District Judge Alison Nathan. It's been a while since the Supreme Court decided that the service violates the law by "transmitting performances of copyrighted work to the public," but it's only now that a judge has issued a temporary ban order. For those who've forgotten what it is: Aereo used to stream live or nearly-live programming to its subscribers' phones, laptops or tablets for $8 a month. Each customer is assigned a minuscule antenna of his own (pictured above), which captures shows from the airwaves, as well as a DVR that stores recordings for a later time. Now, though, it's no longer allowed to beam on-air TV shows to people's devices anymore. Even worse, Judge Nathan has refused to acknowledge it as a cable service, which means it can't reinvent itself as one -- even if it's now willing to pay those licensing fees.

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Does the topic of laser guns intrigue you? Perhaps you're more interested to learn about Facebook's new anonymous chat app? Read on for all our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including Google's Android Wear update, CERN's mysterious photos, our very own gamer's shopping list, and more.

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